Category Archives: Competitions

metals4U Student Sculptors Competition 2019 – Catch-up with Cameron Lings

(Last modified: July 3rd, 2019)

 

metals4U sculptor winner 2019 Cameron Lings

Cameron with his trophy at Yorkshire Sculpture Park

metals4U trophy

Close up of the metals4U Student Sculptors Competition trophy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the last three years, metals4U have proudly sponsored Brian Fell’s Midsummer Metal Sculpture Course held at the Yorkshire Sculpture Park. Over the weekend of the 22nd and 23rd June, Brian’s course was in full swing. Our Student Sculptors Competition 2019 winner, Cameron Lings, was there with other aspiring sculptors as part of his prize.

Cameron’s sculpture titled, ‘Turbine’, caught the attention of the judges to win first prize;

metals4U student Sculptor cameron Lings Turbine

‘Turbine’
(c) Cameron Lings 2019

metals4U student Sculptor cameron Lings Turbine

‘Turbine’
(c) Cameron Lings 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…but when we met him at the course to award him with his trophy we discovered that Cameron had in fact entered our Student Sculptors Competition in 2018, ‘Impurity’ (pictured below)  was not successful in winning first prize last year…

metals4u student sculptor Cameron Lings

‘Impurity’
(c) Cameron Lings 2018

…We are so glad that he entered again as this proves that determination and tenacity can win through if you have the talent.

‘Cell’ (below) is the piece Cameron completed at the Midsummer Sculpture Course;

metals4U winner Cameron Lings Cell

‘Cell’
(c) Cameron Lings 2019

“The sculpture depicts how engineered objects can house or reserve energy that can hold future potential. Here, energy appears free flowing, yet reserved to its origin within the cube, which is balanced on a segment of a sphere. This directly allows us to witness how an atmosphere and geographical location can be influenced by the introduction of man-made power – to benefit the existence and lifestyles of those around it.  You can also relate this to how human potential can be beckoned from within the ‘average’ person, acting as an idea, thought or creative expression, waiting to be released into the world.” [Cameron Lings, 2019]

metals4U winner Cameron Lings Cell

‘Cell’
(c) Cameron Lings 2019

We caught up with Cameron to find out more about his journey with his art studies so far, where he would like his career to take him, and asked him to reflect on his experience of winning the prestigious award.

What, or who, first made you interested in art? Where does your inspiration come from?

Art has forever amused me, as I found it was something I could always turn to when I was bored. Drawing, model-making and painting have always been topics I have thrived at. When deciding what I wanted from my career, originally engineering was my go-to option. I hoped it would fill the gap that opened when my studies temporarily stopped in the arts- this wasn’t the case. I soon went to North Lindsey College, Scunthorpe, where my intentions and aspirations changed completely; studying a Foundation in Art and Design and an A-level in English Literature and Language, this set me up for University in Teesside, at the soon-to-be MIMA School of Art.

 A relative of mine has always worked as an Illustrator. This was something my childhood-self initially inspired to be, I was in awe of the idea of drawing and painting for a living – and I still am! However, it wasn’t until I was mid-way through my college studies that I realised illustration just wasn’t for me; instead, I focused on working in 3D, I found that the challenges sculpture offered me were sufficiently more satisfying. It surfaced that sculpture consists of not only structural building, but design and execution, a unique set of challenges that excited me. After meeting and working alongside accomplished sculptor – Ian Randall – I realised I had a long-term target to aim for. I learned that a combination of hard work, determination and skill, would hopefully result in my long-term success within the world of contemporary art. That is what I am aiming for today.

Until you attended Brian Fells’ sculpture course, what was you level of working with metal and what led to an interest in using it within your work?

I have become somewhat familiar in working with metal for around 18 months. Working with the sculptor, Ian Randall, has widened my knowledge vastly around working with metal, wood and stone. I hope in the future I can design and build large scale public works, predominantly using metal as a preferred medium, mainly due to its sustainability.

metals4U winner Cameron Lings

Cameron working at Brian Fell’s metal course at Yorkshire Sculpture Park

metals4U student sculptors competition 2019 Cameron Lings

‘Cell’ in progress

 

How would you define your work to date, including your preferred mediums, style, techniques etc?

My work is a vast combination of mediums, styles and themes. I don’t like to narrow down my options, so I aim to always work progressively in several material choices. Ceramics, Woodwork, Metalwork and Plastics are used throughout my practice. Regarding my newer work however, I have tended to explore abstraction and environmental-based works. Previously my works were heavily figurative based, that was work I felt ‘safe’ doing. It is only recently I have further distanced myself from literal examples of imagery, instead I aim to portray human and environmental behaviour through the means of, otherwise unrecognisable, shape and form.

What you did on Brian’s course, what was good, what you wish had have been different, things you learned or perfected, and new ideas or skills you were introduced to?

Regarding the experience, I cannot fault any part of it. The creative freedom it provided me with is something I’ve been craving, and I’m highly grateful for being granted the opportunity. As I’ve mentioned, I have been introduced to metalworking before, however I was still able to pick up pointers and helpful guidance tips from the experts, these will aid me throughout my future. I was also able to learn a lot from the other artists on the course, everyone had their own styles, techniques and aims of what they wanted to achieve; this reflection help put my work into an enlightening perspective.

Where to now? Where do you see your future route taking you- how do you hope your future will shape and develop?

I still have at least another year at University, so there is still time for me to explore and develop through my education. Alongside this, I will still be exhibiting works locally and further across the UK. Regarding my long-term future, I would love to work on public commissions while developing my own practice alongside. I have always been one to aim high – that will not change any time soon; so, it’s a matter of maintaining hard work, to keep learning, growing and developing as an artist. Regardless of what is to come, creating art will always be a part of my life.

Halfway through my second year at University, I had a vast body of varied finished and unfinished works, it was only at this stage I began applying to feature in exhibitions and publications. Before this, I had been featured in only 2 exhibitions in the same amount of years. However, over a 6-month window, my work has appeared in over 20 exhibitions across the UK, alongside several magazine features and award nominations. Winning the metals4U Student Sculptor 2019 Award has been the ‘cherry on the cake,’ crowning a frantic – yet exciting – few months.

I have recently come to realise, opportunities are out there, its just matter of making the most of what is at hand and working hard for a future in the arts – it’s something I’m certainly not giving up on any time soon!

I would encourage everyone in the arts to push their efforts to the limits. At the end of the day, opportunities won’t come knocking at your door, you must go out and make them.

metals4U student sculptors winner 2019 Cameron Lings

Cameron receives his metals4U winner’s trophy from Brian Fell.

(left to right- metals4U Managing Director-Paul McFadyen, award winning metal artist- Brian Fell, artist and studio assistant- George Fell, Student Sculptors Competition winner- Cameron Lings, metal sculptor- Owen Cunningham)

Here at metals4U we are very excited to see where Cameron’s creative journey will lead him and we are eager to follow his progress in the successful career we are confident he has ahead of him.

If you would like to see more of Cameron’s work, why not have a look at his Instagram account? 

To read our previous blog showing Cameron’s winning entry to the metals4U Student Sculptors Competition 2019, click here.

metals4U Student Sculptor Competition Winner 2019

(Last modified: June 12th, 2019)

metals4U Student Sculptors Competition 2019 in association with top metal sculptor, Brian Fell, and Yorkshire Sculpture Park is proud to announce this year’s winner…

Cameron Lings

Our third annual Student Sculptors Competition has proved to be quite an event in the art and metalwork students’ calendar- this year we were inundated with entries showing  strong talent in a wide variety of disciplines and styles.

The judging was extremely difficult as there was such a variety of ideas and inspirational work, however, there can only be one winner. Once the official closing time of the competition had passed, all the entries were shown to the exceptional metal artist, Brian Fell, for him to select the overall winner based on the judging criteria set out in the published competition rules.

(c) metals4U Student Sculptors Competition 2019

After a long period of consideration and deliberation, Brian settled on the entry from Cameron Lings.

Cameron has just completed his second year at Teesside University’s MIMA School of Art studying for a BA (Hons) Fine Art. His winning entry titled; ‘Turbine’ is shown below.

metals4U student Sculptors competition 2019 winner

(c) Cameron Ling ‘Turbine’ 2018

Cameron’s entry was accompanied by this descriptive insight into his work;

‘Turbine’ is a sculpture inspired by our ever-developing industrial day-to-day life. In order to develop new ways of creating energy, we have looked to our natural environment, in order to produce electricity from its kinetic movements. The sculpture demonstrates how our natural elements are being industrialised and harvested to their full extent. In this case, the wind is captured and portrayed in hardened metal, representing how engineering processes are making us look at nature from a differential, and clearly useful, point of view. The sculpture also questions our future of the relationship between industry and the environment, and how it will further develop in order for our own benefit.

 

Cameron will attend Brian Fell’s Midsummer Metal Sculpture Course at Yorkshire Sculpture Park  on the 22nd & 23rd June, courtesy of metals4U. Cameron will get the opportunity to receive guidance from experienced metal artists Brian Fell, Owen Cunningham, and George Fell. Cameron’s final piece from the course will also be put on display within the grounds of the sculpture park- now that is something to be proud of.

We can’t wait to see what Cameron makes next…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

metals4U sponsor Team Hare for Formula Student 2019.

(Last modified: March 19th, 2019)

 

Many of you that follow metals4U on social media, or regularly read our blogs, will know that we like to get involved in supporting emerging new talent – particularly when it embraces the next generation of metal workers. We are always interested in how people use metal in engineering and creative projects which is why we are thrilled to add a new sponsorship project to our portfolio.

For 2019, metals4U are Gold tier sponsors of Team HARE; a talented group of students from the University of Huddersfield that are participating in the IMechE (Institution of Mechanical Engineers) Formula Student competition.

Team Hare university of Huddersfield/metals4U

This annual competition entails students from automotive, motorsport, mechanical, and electronic engineering disciplines designing and building a single seat race car prototype. Student teams from all around the world compete in a series of tasks and challenges to earn themselves a place at Silverstone in July.

Throughout the competition, a robust testing process assesses the validity of the car build to culminate in a series of static and dynamic test events held over several days at Silverstone. The team must also work through a series of tasks over several months to produce data on different elements of the vehicle build with harsh point penalties incurred for missing a submission deadline. This competition is not for the faint hearted, the standards are high and the scrutiny on all aspects of the team endeavour is monumental.

Simon Roberts Team Hare

Simon Roberts: Team Principal

The team is made up of 22 students led by Simon Roberts, a 23-year-old Automotive and Motorsport Engineering MEng student.

Simon has been involved with Team Hare for the last 4 years and is really rising to the challenge of being Team Principal this year by taking overall responsibility for  Hare 2019, health and safety, and organising sponsorship and fundraising to ensure the project is  well-supported and sustainable. Simon’s final year project involved him making a bold attempt to turbo-charge the current Hare 19 engine.

 

 

 

Over the coming months we will be sharing much more detail and insight into the progress of the team and the car. To make sure you are always up to date on metals4U news make sure to follow us on Social media.

If you would like to look at the team progress so far, check out the Team Hare Facebook page here.

Learning from the master with Brian Fell

(Last modified: July 3rd, 2019)

Our recent competition to win a place on a masterclass workshop with celebrated sculptor, Brian Fell, proved to be a huge success.

We saw a great response with dozens of fantastic entries, which made Brian’s job a tough one when it came to judging. But one entry stood out above all the others, and that was our winner, Jessica Alice Smith.
Jessica_Smith_1-entry

Brian said of her submission: “Jessica had the strongest application and we felt she would benefit the most from the course”. Here’s her entry that caught Brian’s eye:

My current practice works with themes of balance and fragility; primarily playing with the idea of building up each side of the structure to the pivotal point before it collapses. By doing this I am able to capture the greatest level of tension between the structure and its material.

Though the majority of my work utilises natural and found material, I would love the opportunity to expand this further. The metal workshop would give me the tools needed to push my structures further than ever before, and the opportunity to experiment with heavier, more durable material.

Her prize was a place on the Midsummer Metal workshop that Brian and fellow sculptor, Owen Cunningham, ran in conjunction with Yorkshire Sculpture Park. Here’s what she said of her experience:
IMG_0397

“At the beginning of the course, Brian and Owen ran through all the equipment and showed us how to use each piece. After this, we were shown in groups of three how to weld, including each having a go at welding a straight non-bubbly line.
19490129_10213801307533166_1783233790_o

“The rest of the course was quite self-led. We were provided with all the materials we needed and were given the opportunity to experiment with any ideas or designs we wanted to pursue.

“Both Brian and Owen were really helpful with any questions, and stepped in to show me in more detail how to use the equipment when I needed it. In particular, I was given an extra demonstration on how to use the plasma cutter. I really enjoyed this tool and used it both to cut layers of metal into mountainous shapes for my landscapes, and also as a drawing tool”.
IMG_0395

Watch this space to see how this star of tomorrow progresses in her work.

To see all the amazing submissions we received as part of our Student Sculptors Competition head to our Facebook page.

 

Catching up with our Student Sculptor 2017 winner

(Last modified: June 20th, 2019)

In May last year, metals4U launched our first student sculptor competition in association with Yorkshire Sculpture Park. The first prize was a place on ‘Brian Fell’s Midsummer Metal Workshop’ worth £270. The course ran over two days and was packed with demonstrations, advice and extensive access to metal and specialist equipment.

To enter, students had to be over 18 years of age and simply submit a picture of either their current or best sculpture or their design drawings to be judged by metal sculptor Brian Fell.

Jessica Smith, a student from York St John University, heard about the metals4U Student Sculpture competition from her tutors at university and decided to apply. Her submission was a piece titled, “Sticks and Tape.”

Sculpture made from sticks and tape by student Jessica Smith

‘Sticks and Tape’

The entries into the inaugural competition were all very strong and showcased a tremendous amount of emerging talent from students across the North of England. Brian Fell felt that Jessica’s entry really stood out by saying, “Jessica had the strongest application and we felt she would benefit the most from the course.” Jessica says she was thrilled to win the competition, especially as she had never entered a competition like this before, nor had she ever set foot inside a metalwork shop.

metals4U Student Sculptor competition winner Jessica Smith with Brian Fell at his Midsummer Metals workshop

Jessica attended the course in June 2017 under the expert tutelage of Brian Fell, George Fell and Owen Cunningham. Jessica found the course invaluable to her learning new skills, techniques and discovering the possibilities for creative exploration using metal.

The course began by introducing the students to all the equipment and a tutorial on how to use the tools with the materials available. The workshop attendees were then left to explore and experiment under expert guidance and with practical help always on hand. Jessica particularly enjoyed using the plasma cutter and learning how to weld. This is highly evident in the pieces she is now producing.

Jessica was brought up in Huddersfield; a large market town between Leeds and Manchester in West Yorkshire. Jessica’s grandmother, Kate Powell, is an accomplished artist and provided Jessica with her earliest introduction to technique and, perhaps more importantly, the appreciation of art in all its forms. On leaving King James’ School in Huddersfield where she studied textiles at GCSE, she enrolled on an apprenticeship in floristry. After a short while her growing interest in the formal study of art led her to enrol on an Extended Diploma course at Leeds College of Art. On successful completion of her course in Leeds in 2014, she relocated to start a fine art degree course at Bath School of Art. After a year, Jessica decided to return to the north and transferred to study Fine Art at York St John University. York has been a perfect fit for her as she has fallen in love with the city and the location works well for her to create and promote her art.

Jessica’s early work was focused on landscapes that were created on canvas or board by using mixed media such as rust particles, assorted fibres and, as she confesses, “Anything I could find really, just recycling anything I could get my hands on.” Jessica states the inspiration for her work comes from her love of the Yorkshire Dales.

Her work in sculpture also began by using anything she found lying around; sticks, canes, old broken paint brushes and truly random finds can all be recognised in her early work. Jessica is intrigued by balance and creates structures to see just how far she can push the boundaries to find the critical point just before collapse.

This piece, based on her submitted competition entry, was constructed on the Midsummer Metal Workshop using mild steel, however, Jessica is eager to try out weathering steel (Corten) to see just how the oxidation would change the look of her work over time.

Metal sculpture created by Student Sculptor winner Jessica Smith at Brian Fell's Midsummer Metals workshop

The work she produces now show her inspiration and motivation to demonstrate the transparency of the construction process as an integral component of the final piece.

These pieces have been made since attending the course and show how her metal working skills have flourished and developed to create stunning effects on sheet steel.

 

 

Jessica loves how she can use metal to depict the patchwork effects of the dry-stone walls and fields of the rural northern landscape.

Metal manipulated by Jessica Smith

Since attending the metal sculpture course, Jessica has had her work accepted to appear in several exhibitions.

In July 2017 her work was showcased in a charity exhibition in her home town of Huddersfield to help raise money for the homeless charity, “Huddersfield Change project.” In January of this year her work was shown alongside her fellow third year students in the “Arts and Draught” exhibition at ‘Brew York’ on Walmgate in the heart of the city.

Jessica is certainly gaining a lot of respect within the art local art world and has had several pieces of her work selected to be included in the “ Ones to watch” emerging artist exhibition at Sunny Bank Mills, Leeds, which is on until April 12th – it is well worth the visit to have a look at her work alongside that of another  thirty four  emerging artists. If you cannot make it to Leeds before mid-April, the degree show at York St John University that exhibits this year’s graduating students’ work, will be held in York from June 8th. Do pop along if you get the chance.

Within the next year or so, Jessica hopes to do a master’s degree to extend her skills and knowledge, until then, she intends to keep herself active with her sculptures by applying for the ‘emerging artist’ place on the Scottish Sculpture Workshop’s summer residency. If successful, she will get an opportunity to immerse herself for a whole month in developing her sculpture techniques. We wish her all the very best of luck with her future endeavours and metals4U are thrilled to have been involved in introducing Jessica to the world of creating art from metal.

To see more of Jessica’s work, check out her new website and Instagram portfolios.

Inspiring student sculptors

(Last modified: February 11th, 2019)

Earlier this month Jessica Smith from York St. Johns University was chosen as the worthy winner of our Student Sculptor competition. She took home an invaluable prize – a place on the YSP metal workshop with renowned Sculptor Brian Fell. You can take a look at how she moved her designs on to create a new and exciting piece here.

But it wasn’t an easy decision. Our competition brought a whole host of budding artists out of the woodwork. Here at Metals4U, we were so inspired by the level and quality of entries we had to share some of our favourites with you:

Sharon Thompson
Sharon_Thomson_003
‘My steel sculpture is called “The Lure of Attachment” and is a discarded Mermaids tail. It is a story of transformation, how the lure of attachment, which is represented within the welded metal joins, can entrap us and halt our development.’

 

Hannah Duckworth
Hannah_Duckworth_001
‘My art looks at that most primordial of questions… working with the concepts of religion, redemption, preservation and alchemy I tackle this question. In my most recent work by casting lead into The Bible, a highly symbolic and holy book, I represent two opposing ideas, preservation and destruction of religion.’

 

Sam Copsey
Sam_Copsey_003
‘I am building a large scale insect-like sculpture from found objects and scrap metal, built upon a functioning off road go kart. The twist being that the initial static appearing sculpture comes to life when approached by the viewer.’

 

Deborah Sisk
Deborah_sisk_001
‘I made the sculpture for a nature reserve in the north east of England from nails and wood. Using various types of nails for the feathers I wanted to depict the harsh nature of the metal juxtaposed with the softness of the feathers.’

 

Connor Frederick Lowe
Connor_Fredrick_003
‘I predominately focus on processes of compression, in which I force durable industrial materials such as steel and concrete to behave unpredictably. The stresses between these materials when compressed force them to change in appearance making them look deformed, reflecting my inner personal frustrations with aspects of my life that appear un-controllable.’

 

Megan Louise Ekberg
Megan_Louise_Ekberg_002
‘The genesis of my structure is derived from my interest in architectural art. All buildings as I see them take linear proportions which I first noticed in old classical buildings.’

To see every entry we received head over to our Facebook page.

Learning from the master with Brian Fell

(Last modified: February 11th, 2019)

Our recent competition to win a place on a masterclass workshop with celebrated sculptor, Brian Fell, proved to be a huge success.

We saw a great response with dozens of fantastic entries, which made Brian’s job a tough one when it came to judging. But one entry stood out above all the others, and that was from our winner, Jessica Alice Smith. Jessica_Smith_1-entry

Brian said of her submission: “Jessica had the strongest application and we felt she would benefit the most from the course”. Here’s her entry that caught Brian’s eye:

My current practice works with themes of balance and fragility; primarily playing with the idea of building up each side of the structure to the pivotal point before it collapses. By doing this I am able to capture the greatest level of tension between the structure and its material.

Though the majority of my work utilises natural and found material, I would love the opportunity to expand this further. The metal workshop would give me the tools needed to push my structures further than ever before, and the opportunity to experiment with heavier, more durable material.
IMG_0397

Her prize was a place on the Midsummer Metal workshop that Brian and fellow sculptor, Owen Cunningham, ran in conjunction with Yorkshire Sculpture Park. Here’s what she said of her experience:

“At the beginning of the course, Brian and Owen ran through all the equipment and showed us how to use each piece. After this, we were shown in groups of three how to weld, including each having a go at welding a straight non-bubbly line.
19490129_10213801307533166_1783233790_o

“The rest of the course was quite self-led. We were provided with all the materials we needed and were given the opportunity to experiment with any ideas or designs we wanted to pursue.

“Both Brian and Owen were really helpful with any questions, and stepped in to show me in more detail how to use the equipment when I needed it. In particular, I was given an extra demonstration on how to use the plasma cutter. I really enjoyed this tool and used it both to cut layers of metal into mountainous shapes for my landscapes, and also as a drawing tool”.
IMG_0395

Watch this space to see how this star of tomorrow progresses in her work.

To see all the amazing submissions we received as part of our Student sculptor competition head to our Facebook page.

Calling all sculpture students!

(Last modified: May 9th, 2019)

Are you a student who knows their alloys from their aluminium and their block scraper from their bush pick? Do you love discovering materials, learning new techniques and designing weird and wonderful sculptures? If you’re nodding along then we want to hear from you.

We’ve teamed up with Yorkshire Sculpture Park and artists Brian Fell and Owen Cunningham to give one lucky student a chance to win a free place on their workshop, Midsummer Metal, usually costing £270 per person.

IMG_0525-e1480429376766

Brian Fell is known for creating amazing large scale sculptures in metal like the ‘Ha Ha’ bridge – specially developed for YSP. While Owen has worked with steel for over 20 years creating memorable pieces on display at the Ironbridge Museum and Telford.

The two-day course gives you the opportunity to get creative in a sculptor’s wonderland. You’ll have access to every tool you can think of and all the metal you could need, along with demonstrations, direction and advice from Brian and Owen.

All you have to do to win the prize is show us photos of your sculptures. It could be your latest masterpiece, a sculpture you’re particularly proud of, or your designs for future pieces. Maybe the one you’ll make at Brian’s workshop? Once you’ve got your entry photos ready, submit them here.

Entries are open now and the winner will be announced on June 1st. You have to be a student and over 18 to enter.

Good luck!

Stephen Bunting competition day

(Last modified: February 11th, 2019)

Our competition winners join Stephen for a tournament to remember.

It’s not every day you get to play darts against a former world champion, but for five lucky Stephen Bunting fans we made it happen! On the 28th February we welcomed Stephen and our lucky competition winners at the Wetherby Metals 4 U branch to throw some darts and have some fun!

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After a spot of lunch and a meet and greet with the man himself, Ryan Matthews, Adam Naylor and his son Tai, Gary Williams and his son Lewis, got to ask Stephen any burning questions they had before putting him through his paces with an exciting afternoon of darts.

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First up was Ryan Matthews, who started off slow but brought it back hitting an impressive 180! Next up it was Adam Naylor, it was a close call but the MC’s word was final with Stephen announced as the winner. Closely followed by Lewis Williams, definitely a champion in the making with a sneaky 180 straight in. Stephen was hanging his head in shame after a 2-0 defeat, well done Lewis!

IMG-5304,medium_large.1454417285

Next we had Tai Naylor who got us all biting our nails holding Stephen to the closest match yet. Finally Gary Williams wrapped up the competition, but unfortunately didn’t have the same luck as 9 year old Lewis and walked away with a loss after hitting 141 vs Stephen’s 180.

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With some group photos taken, Stephen signed some dart boards for our youngest winners and gave out some booby prizes too! Definietly an afternoon to remember, many thanks to all involved for making it so enjoyable!

To see more photos from the day take a look at our Facebook album here – http://on.fb.me/1T2lmtD

Look out for our next Metals 4 U competition on our Twitter and Facebook pages. 

Have you heard that bird is the word? Win a chance to play darts against Stephen Bunting!

(Last modified: February 11th, 2019)

The World Darts Championship is over and we couldn’t be prouder of Stephen ‘The Bullet’ Bunting. He played a great first round with a 3-0 win over German player Jyhan Artut. And although he was knocked out in the second round, his opponent- the very experienced Raymond Van Barneveld reportedly said “he hit so many 180’s, I think I’m the lucky one tonight!”

In fact, he hit 15 180’s and topped the leader board with the most amount of maximums. It was only some huge checkouts from Van Barneveld that outshined his fantastic performance. He’s come away positive after an amazing experience, ready for the year ahead.

We thought we would kick off the New Year in style, and launch a competition for some lucky Stephen Bunting fans to come down to Metals4U Wetherby and play darts against the man himself. It will all happen on Thursday 28th January at midday.

All you have to do is copy family guy Stephen’s lead and shoot a short video of you doing the ‘Surfin’ Bird’ dance. Tweet it to us @Metals4U or post it on our Facebook page and we will pick our five favourite entries to win – competition ends 12pm Thursday 21st January & winners announced Friday 22nd January.

Check out Peter… I mean Stephen’s video below:

T&C’s * All winners must be available on 28/01/2016 and be able to provide their own transport to Metals4U located in Wetherby *  Subject to conditions, the competitions winners are entitled to a plus 1 guest * All competition rules and regulations are at the discretion of Metals4U and are subject to change at any time *