Category Archives: Yorkshire Sculpture Park

metals4U Student Sculptors Competition 2019 – Catch-up with Cameron Lings

(Last modified: July 3rd, 2019)

 

metals4U sculptor winner 2019 Cameron Lings

Cameron with his trophy at Yorkshire Sculpture Park

metals4U trophy

Close up of the metals4U Student Sculptors Competition trophy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the last three years, metals4U have proudly sponsored Brian Fell’s Midsummer Metal Sculpture Course held at the Yorkshire Sculpture Park. Over the weekend of the 22nd and 23rd June, Brian’s course was in full swing. Our Student Sculptors Competition 2019 winner, Cameron Lings, was there with other aspiring sculptors as part of his prize.

Cameron’s sculpture titled, ‘Turbine’, caught the attention of the judges to win first prize;

metals4U student Sculptor cameron Lings Turbine

‘Turbine’
(c) Cameron Lings 2019

metals4U student Sculptor cameron Lings Turbine

‘Turbine’
(c) Cameron Lings 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

…but when we met him at the course to award him with his trophy we discovered that Cameron had in fact entered our Student Sculptors Competition in 2018, ‘Impurity’ (pictured below)  was not successful in winning first prize last year…

metals4u student sculptor Cameron Lings

‘Impurity’
(c) Cameron Lings 2018

…We are so glad that he entered again as this proves that determination and tenacity can win through if you have the talent.

‘Cell’ (below) is the piece Cameron completed at the Midsummer Sculpture Course;

metals4U winner Cameron Lings Cell

‘Cell’
(c) Cameron Lings 2019

“The sculpture depicts how engineered objects can house or reserve energy that can hold future potential. Here, energy appears free flowing, yet reserved to its origin within the cube, which is balanced on a segment of a sphere. This directly allows us to witness how an atmosphere and geographical location can be influenced by the introduction of man-made power – to benefit the existence and lifestyles of those around it.  You can also relate this to how human potential can be beckoned from within the ‘average’ person, acting as an idea, thought or creative expression, waiting to be released into the world.” [Cameron Lings, 2019]

metals4U winner Cameron Lings Cell

‘Cell’
(c) Cameron Lings 2019

We caught up with Cameron to find out more about his journey with his art studies so far, where he would like his career to take him, and asked him to reflect on his experience of winning the prestigious award.

What, or who, first made you interested in art? Where does your inspiration come from?

Art has forever amused me, as I found it was something I could always turn to when I was bored. Drawing, model-making and painting have always been topics I have thrived at. When deciding what I wanted from my career, originally engineering was my go-to option. I hoped it would fill the gap that opened when my studies temporarily stopped in the arts- this wasn’t the case. I soon went to North Lindsey College, Scunthorpe, where my intentions and aspirations changed completely; studying a Foundation in Art and Design and an A-level in English Literature and Language, this set me up for University in Teesside, at the soon-to-be MIMA School of Art.

 A relative of mine has always worked as an Illustrator. This was something my childhood-self initially inspired to be, I was in awe of the idea of drawing and painting for a living – and I still am! However, it wasn’t until I was mid-way through my college studies that I realised illustration just wasn’t for me; instead, I focused on working in 3D, I found that the challenges sculpture offered me were sufficiently more satisfying. It surfaced that sculpture consists of not only structural building, but design and execution, a unique set of challenges that excited me. After meeting and working alongside accomplished sculptor – Ian Randall – I realised I had a long-term target to aim for. I learned that a combination of hard work, determination and skill, would hopefully result in my long-term success within the world of contemporary art. That is what I am aiming for today.

Until you attended Brian Fells’ sculpture course, what was you level of working with metal and what led to an interest in using it within your work?

I have become somewhat familiar in working with metal for around 18 months. Working with the sculptor, Ian Randall, has widened my knowledge vastly around working with metal, wood and stone. I hope in the future I can design and build large scale public works, predominantly using metal as a preferred medium, mainly due to its sustainability.

metals4U winner Cameron Lings

Cameron working at Brian Fell’s metal course at Yorkshire Sculpture Park

metals4U student sculptors competition 2019 Cameron Lings

‘Cell’ in progress

 

How would you define your work to date, including your preferred mediums, style, techniques etc?

My work is a vast combination of mediums, styles and themes. I don’t like to narrow down my options, so I aim to always work progressively in several material choices. Ceramics, Woodwork, Metalwork and Plastics are used throughout my practice. Regarding my newer work however, I have tended to explore abstraction and environmental-based works. Previously my works were heavily figurative based, that was work I felt ‘safe’ doing. It is only recently I have further distanced myself from literal examples of imagery, instead I aim to portray human and environmental behaviour through the means of, otherwise unrecognisable, shape and form.

What you did on Brian’s course, what was good, what you wish had have been different, things you learned or perfected, and new ideas or skills you were introduced to?

Regarding the experience, I cannot fault any part of it. The creative freedom it provided me with is something I’ve been craving, and I’m highly grateful for being granted the opportunity. As I’ve mentioned, I have been introduced to metalworking before, however I was still able to pick up pointers and helpful guidance tips from the experts, these will aid me throughout my future. I was also able to learn a lot from the other artists on the course, everyone had their own styles, techniques and aims of what they wanted to achieve; this reflection help put my work into an enlightening perspective.

Where to now? Where do you see your future route taking you- how do you hope your future will shape and develop?

I still have at least another year at University, so there is still time for me to explore and develop through my education. Alongside this, I will still be exhibiting works locally and further across the UK. Regarding my long-term future, I would love to work on public commissions while developing my own practice alongside. I have always been one to aim high – that will not change any time soon; so, it’s a matter of maintaining hard work, to keep learning, growing and developing as an artist. Regardless of what is to come, creating art will always be a part of my life.

Halfway through my second year at University, I had a vast body of varied finished and unfinished works, it was only at this stage I began applying to feature in exhibitions and publications. Before this, I had been featured in only 2 exhibitions in the same amount of years. However, over a 6-month window, my work has appeared in over 20 exhibitions across the UK, alongside several magazine features and award nominations. Winning the metals4U Student Sculptor 2019 Award has been the ‘cherry on the cake,’ crowning a frantic – yet exciting – few months.

I have recently come to realise, opportunities are out there, its just matter of making the most of what is at hand and working hard for a future in the arts – it’s something I’m certainly not giving up on any time soon!

I would encourage everyone in the arts to push their efforts to the limits. At the end of the day, opportunities won’t come knocking at your door, you must go out and make them.

metals4U student sculptors winner 2019 Cameron Lings

Cameron receives his metals4U winner’s trophy from Brian Fell.

(left to right- metals4U Managing Director-Paul McFadyen, award winning metal artist- Brian Fell, artist and studio assistant- George Fell, Student Sculptors Competition winner- Cameron Lings, metal sculptor- Owen Cunningham)

Here at metals4U we are very excited to see where Cameron’s creative journey will lead him and we are eager to follow his progress in the successful career we are confident he has ahead of him.

If you would like to see more of Cameron’s work, why not have a look at his Instagram account? 

To read our previous blog showing Cameron’s winning entry to the metals4U Student Sculptors Competition 2019, click here.

metals4U Student Sculptor Competition Winner 2019

(Last modified: June 12th, 2019)

metals4U Student Sculptors Competition 2019 in association with top metal sculptor, Brian Fell, and Yorkshire Sculpture Park is proud to announce this year’s winner…

Cameron Lings

Our third annual Student Sculptors Competition has proved to be quite an event in the art and metalwork students’ calendar- this year we were inundated with entries showing  strong talent in a wide variety of disciplines and styles.

The judging was extremely difficult as there was such a variety of ideas and inspirational work, however, there can only be one winner. Once the official closing time of the competition had passed, all the entries were shown to the exceptional metal artist, Brian Fell, for him to select the overall winner based on the judging criteria set out in the published competition rules.

(c) metals4U Student Sculptors Competition 2019

After a long period of consideration and deliberation, Brian settled on the entry from Cameron Lings.

Cameron has just completed his second year at Teesside University’s MIMA School of Art studying for a BA (Hons) Fine Art. His winning entry titled; ‘Turbine’ is shown below.

metals4U student Sculptors competition 2019 winner

(c) Cameron Ling ‘Turbine’ 2018

Cameron’s entry was accompanied by this descriptive insight into his work;

‘Turbine’ is a sculpture inspired by our ever-developing industrial day-to-day life. In order to develop new ways of creating energy, we have looked to our natural environment, in order to produce electricity from its kinetic movements. The sculpture demonstrates how our natural elements are being industrialised and harvested to their full extent. In this case, the wind is captured and portrayed in hardened metal, representing how engineering processes are making us look at nature from a differential, and clearly useful, point of view. The sculpture also questions our future of the relationship between industry and the environment, and how it will further develop in order for our own benefit.

 

Cameron will attend Brian Fell’s Midsummer Metal Sculpture Course at Yorkshire Sculpture Park  on the 22nd & 23rd June, courtesy of metals4U. Cameron will get the opportunity to receive guidance from experienced metal artists Brian Fell, Owen Cunningham, and George Fell. Cameron’s final piece from the course will also be put on display within the grounds of the sculpture park- now that is something to be proud of.

We can’t wait to see what Cameron makes next…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Learning from the master with Brian Fell

(Last modified: July 3rd, 2019)

Our recent competition to win a place on a masterclass workshop with celebrated sculptor, Brian Fell, proved to be a huge success.

We saw a great response with dozens of fantastic entries, which made Brian’s job a tough one when it came to judging. But one entry stood out above all the others, and that was our winner, Jessica Alice Smith.
Jessica_Smith_1-entry

Brian said of her submission: “Jessica had the strongest application and we felt she would benefit the most from the course”. Here’s her entry that caught Brian’s eye:

My current practice works with themes of balance and fragility; primarily playing with the idea of building up each side of the structure to the pivotal point before it collapses. By doing this I am able to capture the greatest level of tension between the structure and its material.

Though the majority of my work utilises natural and found material, I would love the opportunity to expand this further. The metal workshop would give me the tools needed to push my structures further than ever before, and the opportunity to experiment with heavier, more durable material.

Her prize was a place on the Midsummer Metal workshop that Brian and fellow sculptor, Owen Cunningham, ran in conjunction with Yorkshire Sculpture Park. Here’s what she said of her experience:
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“At the beginning of the course, Brian and Owen ran through all the equipment and showed us how to use each piece. After this, we were shown in groups of three how to weld, including each having a go at welding a straight non-bubbly line.
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“The rest of the course was quite self-led. We were provided with all the materials we needed and were given the opportunity to experiment with any ideas or designs we wanted to pursue.

“Both Brian and Owen were really helpful with any questions, and stepped in to show me in more detail how to use the equipment when I needed it. In particular, I was given an extra demonstration on how to use the plasma cutter. I really enjoyed this tool and used it both to cut layers of metal into mountainous shapes for my landscapes, and also as a drawing tool”.
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Watch this space to see how this star of tomorrow progresses in her work.

To see all the amazing submissions we received as part of our Student Sculptors Competition head to our Facebook page.

 

Learning from the master with Brian Fell

(Last modified: February 11th, 2019)

Our recent competition to win a place on a masterclass workshop with celebrated sculptor, Brian Fell, proved to be a huge success.

We saw a great response with dozens of fantastic entries, which made Brian’s job a tough one when it came to judging. But one entry stood out above all the others, and that was from our winner, Jessica Alice Smith. Jessica_Smith_1-entry

Brian said of her submission: “Jessica had the strongest application and we felt she would benefit the most from the course”. Here’s her entry that caught Brian’s eye:

My current practice works with themes of balance and fragility; primarily playing with the idea of building up each side of the structure to the pivotal point before it collapses. By doing this I am able to capture the greatest level of tension between the structure and its material.

Though the majority of my work utilises natural and found material, I would love the opportunity to expand this further. The metal workshop would give me the tools needed to push my structures further than ever before, and the opportunity to experiment with heavier, more durable material.
IMG_0397

Her prize was a place on the Midsummer Metal workshop that Brian and fellow sculptor, Owen Cunningham, ran in conjunction with Yorkshire Sculpture Park. Here’s what she said of her experience:

“At the beginning of the course, Brian and Owen ran through all the equipment and showed us how to use each piece. After this, we were shown in groups of three how to weld, including each having a go at welding a straight non-bubbly line.
19490129_10213801307533166_1783233790_o

“The rest of the course was quite self-led. We were provided with all the materials we needed and were given the opportunity to experiment with any ideas or designs we wanted to pursue.

“Both Brian and Owen were really helpful with any questions, and stepped in to show me in more detail how to use the equipment when I needed it. In particular, I was given an extra demonstration on how to use the plasma cutter. I really enjoyed this tool and used it both to cut layers of metal into mountainous shapes for my landscapes, and also as a drawing tool”.
IMG_0395

Watch this space to see how this star of tomorrow progresses in her work.

To see all the amazing submissions we received as part of our Student sculptor competition head to our Facebook page.

Inspiring future sculptors with Yorkshire Sculpture Park

(Last modified: February 11th, 2019)

Regular visitors to the blog will know that we sponsor Yorkshire Sculpture Park. By providing materials to the park and the various programmes they run, we’re supporting them in inspiring more people to think of metal and sculpture, differently.

To kick off the collaboration we partnered with leading metalwork artist, Brian Fell, to host a two-day workshop. Together with his colleague, Owen Cunningham, Brian shared his passion and experience with 15 enthusiastic participants over the course of a weekend.

The workshop group was made up of people with all levels of experience. Using metals in a variety of shapes, sizes and thicknesses – all provided by Metals4U – everyone was encouraged to express themselves by creating pieces from this most versatile of materials.

Brian and Owen were on hand to demonstrate the tools and the techniques they use to ensure everyone learnt something valuable – as well as a few tricks of the trade!

The response from attendees was fantastic and we look forward to the next event.

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Yorkshire Sculpture Park sponsorship

(Last modified: May 7th, 2019)

We’re always looking for ways to support initiatives that have a real impact on the community, that’s why we’re proud to announce our new partnership with Yorkshire Sculpture Park. They challenge, inspire, and delight 400,000 visitors a year, including 48,000 learning visits. If you want to see metal used in an innovative way, this is the place to go. They’ve won heaps of awards for their beautiful exhibitions set in picturesque Yorkshire – and it’s easy to see why.

Photo courtesy of http://www.ysp.co.uk/

The first project we’ll be supporting will be leading metalwork artist Brian Fell’s workshops this autumn. He’ll be running a two day course at YSP with his colleague Owen Cunningham, presenting metal as a versatile and creative material.

The workshops are designed to meet all levels, attendees will see metals in a variety of shapes, sizes and thicknesses. With sheet steel and steel bars, round and square, there’s plenty of opportunities for participants to gain new skills and grow their creativity.

In his sculptures Brian uses cold forging, where the metal isn’t heated but cut and welded, then shaped with hammers or vices. It makes for beautifully intricate detailing and intriguing shapes. During the course, Brian will share his extensive knowledge on the history of sculpture and techniques in cold and furnace forging.  There’ll also be a demonstration of tools, machines and what they can achieve.

metals4U’s Wetherby branch will be supplying all the metal for these workshops and look forward to seeing the creations that come out of it. To hear more about what’s on at YSP including this workshop, keep your eye on the website: http://www.ysp.co.uk/whats-on/this-season