So you want to learn to weld?

(Last modified: February 11th, 2019)

That’s great. Master the art of welding and there’s no end to what you can create. From beautiful art to urban furniture and pretty trinkets, you’ll make great original pieces – and save yourself a shed load of money in the process.

A person welding metal in safety gear

But like any practical skill, welding takes practice and patience to get the technique just right. Here’s our starter checklist for all you novice welders out there to get you ready to start learning.

Safety first

We can’t stress enough how important it is to think about what you need to keep yourself safe before getting started. You’re working with instruments powerful enough to melt metal, so don’t scrimp when it comes to safety gear. You’ll need welding gloves, a welding helmet, safety glasses, and a fireproof coat.

Prep your space

Whether you’re in a workshop or garage, you’ll need to give your surroundings some thought if you’re thinking about welding. Make sure you remove anything flammable, have plenty of space for sparks to fly and have plenty of ventilation. It’s also worth investing in rubber mats or boards to protect yourself against electric shocks.

Know your material

It’s a good idea to swot up on the properties of different metals so you’ll know which are fit for purpose. This includes things like melting temperatures, rate of thermal expansion, heat conduction and cooling rate. It’ll help you to apply the right techniques to stop materials cracking or distorting, for example metal clamps or heat treatments pre and post-weld.

Set your voltage

In most homes you’ll have two voltages available: 110v and 230v. The thicker the material the higher the voltage you’ll have to use. If you’re not sure which voltage to use you can install machines that match them automatically. It’s also worth checking your gas and electric connections at home to make sure they’re secure enough to handle the machinery.

Stock up on fillers

Fillers, or consumables as they’re known in the industry, are materials added to joints when welding. They’re a crucial part of the process. Different materials work best with different fillers, it’s worth asking in-store when you start your project as to which is best to use. Fillers should be kept in a shaded, dry place so make sure your workshop has a good area to keep them.

Now you’re all set to start learning to weld and as the cheapest online supper of welding equipment, we have everything you need to get going. Shop our range here.