Strangways Hall Stonework Restoration

(Last modified: February 11th, 2019)

Our latest entry is from Abbotsbury Stonework, showing their wonderful restoration of the pinnacles on Strangways Hall in Abbotsbury. Rebecca Freiesleben founded the company in 2001, to specialise in headstones, carvings and sculpture.

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Metals4u’s 20mm stainless round bars were used to fix the pinnacles in place. This is an example of where our materials might not be visible, but play a key role in keeping Strangeways Hall looking as impressive now as it was when it was built. These before and after photographs show the fine work Abbotsbury Stonework do. If you are interested in ordering any stonework or even learning how to carve stone yourself, you can visit  here.

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metals4U Sponsored Seven Club’s Shoe-Box Racing Night

(Last modified: September 27th, 2019)

The Pre-war Austin Seven Club’s Shoe-Box Racing Night was a great success. With a fantastic turnout of 52 spectators, coupled with new awards to make 2013’s event a vintage year. The Metals4u Novelty Award was won by Terry Johnson for the Penelope Pitstop Limo.

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The technical award went to Stewart Ulph for Brooklands Blown, with the Concours d’Elegance going to Christine Duggleby for Chris’s Cracker. The Main Event was won by Cliff Ringrose with Cliff’s Hanger after a gruelling four runs. The PWA7 Club is delighted with the success of the evening and would like to thank all who attended. You can follow all the activities of the PWA7 club here.

 

Aluminium Tabor Pipe

(Last modified: February 11th, 2019)

A tabor pipe is technically an ‘end blown’ flute. Tin whistles and recorders are well known examples. Holes along the length are covered with the fingers to produce various musical notes. A tabor pipe has just three holes, two on top and one underneath covered by the thumb. This allows it to be played with one hand, leaving the other hand free to beat a tabor – a small drum suspended from the arm or hand.
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I have several tabor pipes in various keys, made of both wood and plastic. A friend recently loaned me a professionally made aluminium pipe in the key of ‘A’. I loved the sound but one had to blow really hard to obtain the notes in the second octave, which made it awkward (and exhausting!) to play.

I felt that I could make a better one. A plastic pipe in ‘A’ currently costs around £50, aluminium ones substantially more and only to special order. An outlay of £42.85 (including carriage) for sufficient aluminium to make several pipes seemed a good investment.

A flute works by directing a stream of air to the end of a tube, causing a vibration to be set up that produces a musical note.

The components consist of a length of tube (the actual pipe) and a mouthpiece body that contains a central plug and an inner sleeve. The sleeve has a slot along its length that forms the airway. Because the plug was tapered, a central hole was drilled and tapped and the taper turned on a screwed mandrel. A screw was made to plug the tapped hole on assembly. The airway is directed slightly upwards and this meant that the sleeve had to be tapered both on the outside diameter and inside the bore; bit tricky but was achieved without mishap. Photograph 2 shows the finished components ready for assembly prior to tuning (by reducing the overall length in small increments), drilling the finger holes and shaping the mouthpiece. Photograph 3 shows the finished pipe.

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The end result was extremely rewarding, I love the sound and all possible notes are easily obtained. In fact it plays as well, if not better, than any other pipe that I have paid good (and sometimes much!) money for.

All the work was done on a small lathe in my garden shed workshop.

Mark Gallon.

We’re often amazed by the variety of projects that customers use our metals for. Thank you Mark for sending in this impressive and very interesting instrumental addition to the blog.

Atomic Zombie Recumbent Cycle

(Last modified: February 11th, 2019)

We recently received a great email from a customer who wanted to share his Atomic Zombie Recumbent cycle project.

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Dear Metals4U,

Having seen some of the projects on the website I thought I’d add mine too. I have a bad back which has prevented me from riding a ‘normal’ cycle for many years now. I became interested in recumbent cycles and trikes and did some market research only to find that these typically cost £1000 to £4500 – far beyond my budget! I did further research into plans online and found the Atomic Zombie website.

They specialise in homemade cycles from the unusual to the downright weird – I was hooked! I bought the plan for their Warrior trike and it turned out to be simplicity itself with over two hundred photos and lots of clear explanatory text. This is my first serious metal project and whilst the frame is yet to be painted and I am still tweaking bits & pieces I am very happy with the trike and have been on several rides. The cycles on the Atomic Zombie website are designed to be built with second hand components from salvaged bikes, but there is nothing stopping you from using nice clean, fresh steel.

Metals4U were quick, seemed cheap and supplied exactly what I wanted – thanks guys! I have attached a photo or two – another can be seen in the Atomic Zombie newsletter (August 2010 edition) – have a look at the News section and browse the builders blog – they’re a helpful lot if you get stuck!

Best regards and happy building!
Nick Prescott

Cameron Baloons

Cameron Balloons

(Last modified: February 11th, 2019)

Cameron Balloons has a long history of manufacturing hot air balloons, and is responsible for around 70% of the hot air balloons in the UK today. The company manufactures bespoke designs for a range of applications – from sport to pleasure, marketing to record-breaking attempts.

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Renishaw Logo

Renishaw

(Last modified: February 11th, 2019)

Renishaw specialises in high-precision products and services. The company’s routes are in touch-trigger probes and measurement styli innovation. Today, they are a market leader in measurement devices, motion control, precision machining and spectroscopy.

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JCB

JCB

(Last modified: February 11th, 2019)

JCB manufactures a range of heavy or labour saving machinery, serving the agriculture, construction and demolition industries. The company produces more than 300 varieties of machine to be sold in over 150 countries.

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norgren

Norgren

(Last modified: February 11th, 2019)

Norgren is a manufacturer with its roots firmly planted in the pneumatic and hydraulics industries. Described as a “world leader in motion and fluid control technologies”, they produce many well-known product brands as well as bespoke solutions for clients.

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Phillips 66

Phillips 66

(Last modified: February 11th, 2019)

Phillips 66 is a US based petrochemical company with a significant presence in the UK, with a highly advanced refinery in North Lincolnshire. The complexity of the refinery allows it to produce a wide range of petrochemical products, from anode coke to diesel and LPG.

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