Team Hare Sponsorship- Electrical and Control Systems

(Last modified: May 14th, 2019)

As part of our ongoing sponsorship of Team Hare throughout their Formula Student 2019 season, we caught up with the Electrical and Control Systems Integration department to see how their elements of the team build are going.

The electrical and controls systems integrations are a physical interconnection of devices that impact the performance and operation of other systems and devices within the car build.The Formula Student rules for the 2019 season are devised and implemented by IMechE- the rules run to very tight specifications so the role of the Electrical Systems Designer is to ensure that all the restrictions and specs are strictly adhered to ensure safety, while also endeavouring to optimise performance.

It has been very busy for Team Hare this year and the design and build of the electrical system has been compromised due to changes in the powertrain and body system. The main priority of the electrical department is to offer reliability and durability while the car competes in several dynamic events in the United Kingdom and across Europe. Dedication and commitment are required during the project to meet the planned dates for engine testing and control systems functionality, whilst working concurrently with the other departments.

Here is a quick insight into the responsibilities of the electrical and control systems team.

electrical integration metals4U Team Hare 2019

 

The electrical and control systems integration department consists of one BEng Student, Panagiotis Kyriakou.

 

metals4U team hare sponsorship panagiotis Kyriakou

Panagiotis Kyriakou. Electrical Systems Designer

 

 

Panagiotis Kyriakou is originally from Deryneia, Cyprus; he is solely responsible for the integration of electrical and control systems, including the dyno and chassis loom design. Currently studying for his BEng Automotive and Motorsport Engineering, he also likes to learn about cutting edge technologies in his free time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Team Hare Sponsorship- Chassis Construction Team.

(Last modified: April 29th, 2019)

As Gold Tier Sponsors of Team HARE-19 from the University of Huddersfield, we took the opportunity to catch up with the chassis construction team to see how they are getting on as the Formula Student 2019 competition rapidly approaches ‘crunch’ time.

The Chassis department comprises of two MEng students, Filip Sieminski and Jamie Mistry.

The main focus of Filip’s development is to design and manufacture a tubular cold drawn steel spaceframe chassis. The main challenge of this year’s spaceframe design was to accompany the newly applied 10-inch wheel geometry. A target for the design was to allow the vehicle to be easily maintained with the design philosophy of applying a mainframe and sub-frame system. The sub-frame houses the engine, drivetrain assembly and the rear suspension, this is to allow easy maintenance and service of the engine whilst at events. To produce the spaceframe, the method of using TIG welded technology has been utilised.

Jamie’s focus this year has been on redesigning and manufacturing the braking system, including the pedal box assembly with the aim to be easily maintained, adjustable, lightweight and ergonomic. The braking system consists of newly designed laser cut brake discs and braided lines to enable exceptional braking force which provides superb driver feedback, whilst also reducing rotational mass (Inertia). The braking system is really crucial to the HARE-19 vehicle build, as a minimal stopping distance will decrease lap times and give the team a competitive edge over opponents. This is achieved through reducing the un-sprung mass and optimising the design by conducting computational simulation analysis and testing.

chassis construction infographic metals4U

 

Filip Sieminski- Chassis Construction Team Leader.

 

 

Filip Sieminski is working towards his Automotive and Motorsport Engineering MEng at Huddersfield. Originally form Poland, Filip has maximised the opportunities that studying in Huddersfield has to offer- when not working incredibly hard as the Chassis Construction Team Leader, he likes to eat, sleep, and party. Filip is particularly proud of the fact he has completed all the ‘eating challenges’ in Huddersfield.

 

 

 

 

Jamie Mistry. Chassis Construction Team Manager.

 

 

Jamie is studying for his Mechanical Engineering MEng. From Halifax, Jamie is proudly the only northerner on the team this year. When not designing the pedal box and braking system for the Formula Student car, he enjoys motorcycling, travel, and participating in a variety of sports.

 

 

 

 

 

If you are embarking on a motorsport project and are in need of EN 10305-1 specification mild steel tube or BS4 T45 grade steel tube, check out our online store, or call our friendly and knowledgeable customer services advisors to find out more, or place an order.

Until the end of May, our T45 tube is discounted by a massive 30%- so grab yourself a bargain and don’t forget, we offer free delivery on all orders over £75.

 

Offer valid until Friday May 31st 2019.

 

 

 

Team Hare Sponsorship- What are Aerodynamics?

(Last modified: May 8th, 2019)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As you  probably already know, metals4U are sponsoring the Formula Student team from the University of Huddersfield for this racing season. We are delighted to be able to put our name to this amazing endeavour. The team of young men and women are working around the clock to ensure that every element of this year’s car is performing to the highest standard.

Last week, Team Hare revealed the new chassis design for the competition, here is the CAD presentation to give you an idea of what the final build will look like.

Team Hare car metals4U

The Team Hare entry for 2019

Now we can see what the final build will look like, we can start to appreciate just how much work has already been done this season.

The design of the aero package (front and rear wings, nose cone,sidepods, floor diffuser and bodywork) is not just to look good, every single element has to ensure that the car is subjected to minimal drag and maximum streamlining for optimal performance…Think bullet rather than parachute!

The aerodynamics team have been busy during the planning stage to see how they can work with the drag and lift forces that are created when air passes around and over an item- particularly when that item is travelling at speed- they need to be able to create a perfect balance of keeping the car securely on the road, while minimising the drag forces that will slow it down unnecessarily or create instability.

Due to the costings of the bodywork construction and not having a full size wind tunnel, Team Hare have come up with a solution to testing the aerodynamic performance without creating a full size body kit. ‘Experimental Designs’ have 3D printed a 10th scale model of the aero package to enable Team Hare to test in the windtunnel to ensure their CFD (Computational fluid dynamics) predictions are accurate before investing in the full size, and full cost, componants.

This week we caught up with the aerodynamics team led by Charlie May and Rafael Doherty to see how they were getting on, they had this update for us;

“The Aerodynamics department has focused on ease of manufacturability this year whilst also ensuring a beneficial aerodynamic performance package is created.  Due to struggles within the manufacturing of aerodynamic components in recent years, simplified yet effective designs have been implemented.  A huge amount of work has been spent tweaking aerofoil angles and analysing airflows over the vehicle to ensure each component is as effective as possible, and this simplified approach has allowed the aerodynamics department to work towards the ‘Aero on a budget’ award at Formula Student Silverstone, with the front wing, sidepods, rear wing, nose cone, bodywork, and floor diffuser all aiming to be manufactured for under £1800. With materials beginning to be delivered, it’s time to get our hands dirty and get building ready for the new HARE-19 vehicle.”

 

Aerodynamics team hare metals4U

Charlie May. Aerodynamics and Bodywork Leader.

 

Charlie is the Aerodynamics and Bodywork Team leader. Currently studying for his Automotive and Motorsport Engineering MEng, he is responsible for the design of the aero package, the manufacture of the bodywork, and composite material elements of the vehicle build.

 

 

team hare metals4U

Rafael Doherty. Deputy Aerodynamics Manager

 

Rafael is an exchange student from Brazil studying at the University of Hudderfield for 6 months as he works  towards his Mechanical Engineering MEng. Rafael is reponsible for designing the front wing, nose and the rear wing using CAD and CFD analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Team Hare Sponsorship- What is the Powertrain?

(Last modified: May 8th, 2019)

This year’s gold tier sponsorship of Team HARE is one of the really exciting endeavours of our 2019 pledge to continue our support of innovation and emerging talent in engineering.

Team Hare are continuing to work tirelessly towards creating their best performing Formula Student car for the 2019 season. This week we caught up with the team to see how they are progressing.

Last time we caught up with Team Hare, we looked a little closer at the drivetrain- if you missed it, you can read all about it  here.

This week we caught up with the ‘Powertrain’ team to find out how they are getting on.They had this to say;

The main aim for the department this year is to have the engine operating reliably whilst producing a high power output. With the teams major changes to the chassis and suspension, there has also been a lot of work with regards to redesigning a new exhaust, lubrication and fueling systems. A huge amount of hours have been spent dyno testing the engine, this assists us with ensuring we will have reliability throughout 2019’s formula student events through correcting and improving the current engine build.  An exciting few months are now ahead of us, as parts of the car start to arrive and we get to see how well our engine performs in the newly designed car.”

The powertrain is the system that transfers the drive from the engine right through to the axles. Whereas the drivetrain is concerned with the drive from the transmission onwards, the powertrain is concerned with all the parts that convert the engine’s power to movement- all elements of propelling the vehicle.

The performance of the engine has to harness the power of combustion to deliver energy to the crankshaft- here the linear motion energy is converted into a rotary motion known as ‘torque’. This torque is then controlled by the transmission system, which then passes the energy onwards through the remainder of the powertrain that is comprised of the drivetrain elements.

 

A simplified explanation of the powertrain.

powertrain infographic metals4U

 

The powertrain team is led by Conor and Jack, they are responsible for ensuring everything runs smoothly and on time within their team.

 

powertrain team metals4U

Conor O’Brien. Powertrain Team Leader

 

Conor O’Brien is the Powertrain Team Leader with overall responsibility for the management of the engineering of the powertrain and the rest of the team. Conor is currently studying for his Automotive and Motorsport Engineering MEng and hopes to pursue a career in motorsport once he completes his Masters- he is certainly off to a good start.

 

 

 

 

powertrain metals4U

Jack Watson. Powertrain Team Manager

 

Jack Watson is also studying for his Automotive and Motorsport Engineering MEng and is sharing leadership of developing the powertrain. Jack’s role specifically sees him working on engine mapping and intake and exhaust design.

 

 

 

 

To keep up to date on our sponsorship activity, follow us on social media!

 

metals4U are latest sponsors of University of Leeds Formula Student 2019

(Last modified: May 8th, 2019)

Formula Student season is now in full swing, and as part of our ongoing support of student talent we are pleased to be able to add the University of Leeds Formula Student team to our portfolio of sponsorships for the 2019 season.

We are very excited that steel and aluminium (sheet and tube)  supplied by metals4U has been used throughout their vehicle design this year.

metals4U sponsor university of Leeds

Welded frame of the 2019 Formula Student entry from the University of Leeds.

This year the team are competing in two events; the annual UK event at Silverstone (17th
-21st July 2019) and, for the first time,  an event in Italy (24th-28th July 2019).

The project is led by third year mechanical engineering student, Julian Kautsch, who is overseeing the team efforts and targets for the FS19  season which are outlined below ;

• To finish in the top 10 at the UK competition
• To finish construction by the end of March
• To compete in a competition abroad
• To do a minimum of 500km of testing prior to competition
• To create stable foundations which next year’s team can build upon

A couple of these goals are already in sight as the construction of this year’s vehicle build is 3 months ahead when compared to last year’s progress and they are already set to compete in Europe.

Months of planning, testing, and incredibly hard work are now coming to fruition as the team prepare for the demands of the gruelling challenges of static and dynamic testing, these tasks are set to showcase the very best in engineering acheivements for this year’s student entrants.

The University of Leeds Formula Student team had these kind words to say about our sponsorship;

” We are extremely grateful to have formed a sponsorship deal with metals4U who have kindly
provided us with a range of metal tubing and sheeting which will be utilised across our vehicle. For
example, the aluminium tubing is going to be used inside the wings, the steel tubing for rear wing
mounting and the aluminium sheeting for the undertray and body panels.”

steel tube metals4U

metals4U steel tubing used for rear wing mounting (shown in red)

We look forward to following the progress of the team- to keep up to date with all things Formula Student, follow us on social media!

 

 

 

Team Hare Sponsorship – What is the Drivetrain?

(Last modified: May 8th, 2019)

This week we caught up with Team Hare 19  to see how things are taking shape this season, and in particular what the drivetrain team are working on at the moment- Team HARE’s drivetrain team are responsible for the configuration of the drive method between the engine and wheels, as well as the gear shifting method. They had this to say,

“This year’s aim for the drivetrain team is to ensure an efficient and reliable gear shifting method. Decision was made to utilise a mechanically hand activated gear shifter as this would drastically reduce overall weight and packaging. Current focus is made to maximise feel in the gear shifter. Numerous components have been designed to ensure minimum deflection of the push pull cable when it is in motion.”

The drivetrain is not a part of the engine, it is the system of component parts from the transmission to the wheels- the system of transferring the power from transmissionright through to the clutch, gears and differential to the axles and wheels; basically, everything beyond the transmission concerned with propelling the car forward!

A simplified explanation of the drivetrain.

 

As part of our sponsorship of Team Hare, this week we would like to showcase two members of Team Hare with overall responsibility for the drivetrain.

Ben Tripp. Drivetrain Team Leader

 

 As the Drivetrain Team Leader, Ben Tripp has overall responsibility for ensuring everything within the drivetrain system works and oversees the rest of the drivetrain team.

Ben  is a student from Cambridge currently on the Mechanical Engineering MEng course at the University of Huddersfield.

 

 

 

 

Stefanos Savva. Drivetrain Team Manager

 

As the Drivetrain Team Manager, Stephanos Savva has responsibility for ensuring the drivetrain parts are in optimum working condition and replacing or repairing parts if modifications are necessary.

Stephanos  is also studying for his Mechanical Engineering MEng at the University of Huddersfield.

 

 

 

 

 

Don’t forget to follow us on social media to keep up to date with our sponsorship of Team Hare 19!

 

 

How to cut metal; a focus on safety

(Last modified: March 21st, 2019)

Most metal working projects will require cuts to be made during fabrication. There are many different cutting methods and equipment options available ranging from simple hand tools to industrial specialist machinery. Although all methods will result in a cut being made through metal, it is really important to choose the most appropriate process for the specified task. By understanding how the tools work, and how and when to use each method, it will be easier to make the right choice first time- saving time, money, and of course, maintaining workshop safety.

A note on safety.

When performing any task involving metal, safety should be a priority. Always follow the safety procedures laid down by workplace protocols and any training courses attended. If there are any concerns relating to workshop safety, these publications are available as free downloads from the HSE website; ‘Health and Safety in Engineering Workshops’   and  ‘The safe use of compressed gases in welding, flame cutting and allied processes’.

Personal Protective Equipment should never be overlooked, even if you think the task will be quicker to complete than hunting down your safety equipment, it is never worth the risk. PPE can help protect from burns, cuts, and metal chips becoming embedded in skin and eyes.

PPE safety sign metals4U

PPE should include;

  • A full-face welding mask for plasma cutting and protective eyewear as a minimum for all other cutting methods.
  • Ear defenders as the noise from machinery can permanently damage hearing and has been linked to the onset of tinnitus.
  • Sturdy foot protection, no-one really wants hot sparks flying in their shoes- reinforced toe boots make sense when cutting metal in case the offcut falls.
  • Long sleeved tops and full-length trousers to protect skin from hot sparks and metal chips travelling at high speed.
  • Protective gloves- make sure these are fit for purpose; holes and splits will offer no protection and if they don’t fit properly, they will restrict your movement.

Tool Safety.

saw blade metals4U

  • Always ensure tools are well maintained; check switches, cables, and consumables for signs of damage or wear and ensure blades are sharp- a dull blade is more likely to slip and jump on the metal surface which can damage the metal and lead to injury.
  • Replace consumables, such as blades and cutting discs, once signs of heavy use appear.
  • Always ensure you disconnect tools from the power supply before replacing the blades or performing any adjustments to the settings.

Workshop safety.

workshop metals4U

  • Keep the floor and surfaces free from clutter, trailing flexes, and debris.
  • Take your time- Rushing about in a workshop environment can increase the risk of trips, slips and injury.
  • Wipe up spills immediately to reduce the risk of liquids coming into contact with electrical items.
  • Take extra care when handling flammable substances.
  • Do not let children into the workshop unsupervised, if they are watching an adult work, they should also be provided with suitable PPE.

Following the above suggestions should help keep you safe while cutting metal in the workplace or home workshop.

To find out about all the different types of metal cutting processes and guidance on how to perform them, please click on the links below.

 

score and snap tools metals4U

Cutting metal using score and snap

reciprocating saw metals4U

Cutting metal with a reciprocating saw

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

cnc guillotine metals4U

Cutting metal with a guillotine

tin snips metals4U

Cutting metal with tin snips

 

 

 

 

 

chop saw metals4U

Cutting metal with a chopsaw and mitre saw

pipe cutter

Cutting metal with a pipe cutter

 

 

 

 

 

 

metals4U jigsaw

Cutting metal with a jigsaw

metals4U angle grinder

Cutting metal with an angle grinder or disc cutter

 

 

 

 

 

 

metals4u hacksaw

Cutting metal with a hacksaw

metals4U bandsaw

Cutting metal with a bandsaw

 

 

 

 

 

metals4U circular saw

Cutting metal with a circular saw

metals4U plasma cutting

Cutting metal with a plasma cutter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to cut metal with a circular saw

(Last modified: March 21st, 2019)

Circular saws work on the same principle as a mitre or chop saw, however, a circular saw is not fixed to a cutting plinth; this gives complete freedom over the cutting movement to enable freehand straight and gently curved cuts to achieved. As with most power tools, models vary in price depending on extra features incorporated to improve the user experience. For occasional use a standard basic model will adequately perform metal cutting applications, however, for more frequent or robust projects it will be worth investing in a heavy-duty model. When using a circular saw for cutting metal it is important to ensure it has an enclosed motor housing to protect the motor from damage caused by metal chips.

metals4U circular saw

Circular saws are held with both hands to support and guide the blade through the workpiece, the saw is always used in a ‘pushing away’ motion with the rear of the blade covered by a guard that moves to surround the blade in response to the position of the workpiece; the top of the blade is covered by a fixed guard. Most models have an additional handle to enable the best hand positioning while working and a guide rail system to line up with cutting lines.

Choosing the correct blade is important to maintain safety and to ensure an accurate cut. Only blades and discs specified for cutting metal should be used. These professional blades are perfect for cutting through aluminium, copper, lead and other non-ferrous metals; while these diamond cutting discs will make light work of cutting through stainless steel.

Tips for cutting metal with a circular saw.

  • In addition to standard safety equipment such as eye, hand, and ear protection, it is also recommended to wear long sleeves to protect skin from hot and sharp metal chips that will fly from the blade at high speed.
  • Before connecting the saw to a power supply, select the correct blade for the project and adjust the circular saw settings to ensure all fittings and attachments are correctly aligned and tightened. The cutting depth of the blade should not be set to exceed ¼ inch (6mm) beyond the thickness of the metal.
  • Mark the cutting line with a marker or scoring scribe and firmly fix the workpiece with clamps. Ensure the blade has clearance on the underside, if it does not then the metal can be mounted on rails or across two work horses.
  • Connect the power, then align the blade with the proposed cutting line without the blade being in contact with the metal edge, use the cutting guides to help. Slowly depress the trigger to power up the blade, once it has come up to speed, carefully slide the blade into the metal- do not rush or force the cut, just let the blade do the work.
  • Regularly apply cutting fluid as the saw travels the length of the cut to reduce heat and allow a clean cut.
  • Once the cut is complete, disconnect the power supply to the saw. Do not touch the cut edge or the blade after cutting as they will be hot enough to cause a burn.

How to cut metal with a bandsaw

(Last modified: March 21st, 2019)

Bandsaws are a power tool that have a looped metal cutting blade tensioned over 2 pulleys. The top pulley retains and guides the blade, while the lower pulley varies the speed. The blade runs in one direction rather than with the ‘up and down’ movement of a jig saw.  Bandsaws are not suitable for cutting very thin sheet metal; a rule of thumb suggests the metal to be cut should be thicker than the depth of 3 bandsaw blade teeth, however they are excellent for cutting thin walled profiles such as box and angle.

metals4U bandsaw

Blades are available in different widths suited for different cutting requirements; thicker blades work well for thicker metal stock and straight cuts, whereas a thinner blade is better suited to cutting curves. Blades with a higher tpi provide a smoother cut edge whereas blades with a lower tpi make light work of cutting through thicker metal stock.

Bandsaws are available as cordless units, bench top models, and as freestanding floor models.  As with most power tools, the range of extra features increases from standard settings on smaller DIY models to a fully comprehensive range of additional features available on the more professional models, extra features may include mitre cutting settings, more variable speed settings, and hydraulic descent in addition to standard manual descent. Bandsaw speed settings are measured in either metres per minute (mpm) or the more standard revolutions per minute (rpm).

Tips for cutting metal with a bandsaw.

  • Ensure correct PPE including eye and ear protection is worn.
  • Mark or score the cut line if necessary.
  • Ensure that the blade is suitable for cutting metal and that it is correctly fitted and tensioned.
  • Make sure all blade guards are in the correct position and free from defect.
  • Adjust all settings for the type of cut being performed; such as speed and mitre angle for example.
  • Connect the power and make sure all cables are out of the way of the blade, then start the machine.
  • When using a bandsaw set in the vertical position, cutting is achieved by resting the metal on the plate and pushing it towards the blade while maintaining pressure. The blade can pass completely through the workpiece or the workpiece can be simply withdrawn, rotated and pushed towards the blade again to make additional cuts.
    • If cutting an intricate design, it is advisable to make a series of relief cuts to reduce any binding on the blade.
    • When cutting curves, it is best to start at the shallowest angle of the curve and work towards the steepest angle to reduce the risk of the blade veering off from the cut line. If both ends of the curve are shallow, make a cut from each end until they meet at the middle.
  • For cuts using the hydraulic arm capabilities of some bandsaw models, place the metal on the support table and ensure it is firmly held against the rear guard, lower the arm to move the blade downwards through the workpiece.
  • For cuts using a cordless bandsaw; ensure the workpiece is secure, line up the blade to the intended cut line and lower the blade into the metal. Once the cut has been made, stop the blade and withdraw.
  • If the blade begins to stick or bind, stop the blade and apply some wax stick directly to the teeth of the blade.

How to cut metal with a hacksaw

(Last modified: March 21st, 2019)

Hacksaws are a hand tool that is a very versatile addition to any workshop. Hacksaws work by simply moving the blade through the metal backwards and forwards in a regular ‘sawing’ action. The C shaped handles are relatively cheap to buy and the wide range of blades available enables a wide range of profile thickness and metal grades to be cut easily. The handles range from basic varieties that simply, yet securely, hold the hack saw blade in place through to professional varieties that have easy to use features such as; thumb dial tensioners in the handle to provide 150kg or 30,00 psi blade tension, adjustment to accommodate 250mm or 300mm blades, and  secondary blade positioning to enable 45° blade angle for flush cutting or 90° for general cutting.

metals4u hacksaw

Hacksaw blades are selected by choosing the correct tpi (teeth per inch) for the type of metal that needs to be cut. The higher the tpi, the more aggressive the cut. The teeth are configured to face towards one end of the blade and the blades can be mounted in the handle with the teeth facing forwards or backwards- the benefit of this is that the power of the ‘towards’ or ‘away’ stroke can be focussed to provide the user with the best cutting ergonomics. Many metal workers prefer to focus the main cutting stroke as the ‘away’ stroke as this provides a clearer view of the cut because the chips are moved forwards during operation.

Hacksaw blade tpi recommendations.

Tpi  (teeth per inch / 25mm of blade)

Suggested usage

14

Large profiles, aluminium, softer metals

18

General workshop projects

24

Steel plate up to 5/6mm thickness

32

Hollow sections and steel tubing

 

Tips for cutting metal using a hacksaw.

  • Always wear eye protection and gloves when cutting metal.
  • Select the correct blade for the project being undertaken and ensure it is securely inserted in the frame/ handle with the teeth facing either forwards or backwards depending on preference.
  • Check the blade is rigid, correctly aligned, and taut.
  • Clamp the workpiece or place it in a vice; if this is not possible as the metal is joined to another object, ensure the piece you are not wishing to remove will remain secure once the other piece has been cut off.
  • To begin the cut, make a series of one-way strokes against the direction of the teeth – this will create a narrow incision that the blade can sit in. Once the blade has gained purchase in a millimetre or so of the surface, the full forward and backwards sawing action will soon enable the cut off to be completed.
  • Try not to rush; a smooth, steady sawing action will provide the best cut and will reduce the likelihood of the blade overheating and breaking. A little machine oil or cutting fluid placed on the blade will reduce friction.